UK Weather: Britain to bask in 91F heat on Father’s Day

Britain has basked in the hottest day of the year so far – just shy of 90F – and temperatures are set to soar even higher tomorrow.

And what better way to enjoy it than finding a nice, quiet sunbathing space to call your own on Brighton Beach – only to realise that hundreds of other sun-seekers had exactly the same idea?

As the picture below shows, the shingled shoreline on the East Sussex coast was jam-packed with sun cream-slathered bodies.  

The mercury peaked at 89.4F (31.9C) at Hampton Water Works in south-west London today, while scorching weather was also enjoyed by the majority of Britons.

Meanwhile, music fans could enjoy the hottest ever Glastonbury Festival in the coming week with the mercury possibly hitting 93F (34C) – which is 10C higher than usual, forecasters say.

The weather is expected to stay dry in the lead-up to the weekend, with a 20 per cent chance of ‘isolated showers’ on Wednesday and Thursday.

A ‘wedge’ of hot air from France could blow over to the Somerset site on Thursday, resulting in the sizzling temperature.

Glastonbury’s infamous mud could make an appearance at the weekend though, when the weather is expected to be ‘changeable’. 

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The shingled shoreline of Brighton Beach on the East Sussex coast was jam-packed with sun-seekers today

The shingled shoreline of Brighton Beach on the East Sussex coast was jam-packed with sun-seekers today

The shingled shoreline of Brighton Beach on the East Sussex coast was jam-packed with sun-seekers today

Today is expected to be the hottest June 18 on record, with the mercury hitting 91F (33C) on Father's Day in Britain. Pictured, a woman relaxes this morning in Gyllyngvase, in Falmouth, Cornwall

Today is expected to be the hottest June 18 on record, with the mercury hitting 91F (33C) on Father's Day in Britain. Pictured, a woman relaxes this morning in Gyllyngvase, in Falmouth, Cornwall

Today is expected to be the hottest June 18 on record, with the mercury hitting 91F (33C) on Father’s Day in Britain. Pictured, a woman relaxes this morning in Gyllyngvase, in Falmouth, Cornwall

This could be the warmest June 18 since records began 167 years ago; the present record is 32.2C, set in 1893 in Ochtertyre, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Above, sun seekers in Cornwall

This could be the warmest June 18 since records began 167 years ago; the present record is 32.2C, set in 1893 in Ochtertyre, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Above, sun seekers in Cornwall

This could be the warmest June 18 since records began 167 years ago; the present record is 32.2C, set in 1893 in Ochtertyre, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Above, sun seekers in Cornwall

Temperatures are set to rise even further this coming week. Above,  the scene on Weymouth Beach, Dorset, today

Temperatures are set to rise even further this coming week. Above,  the scene on Weymouth Beach, Dorset, today

Temperatures are set to rise even further this coming week. Above,  the scene on Weymouth Beach, Dorset, today

Temperatures are expected to continue rising into the low 30s into early next week. Above, a woman enjoys the sunshine in Greenwich Park this afternoon

Temperatures are expected to continue rising into the low 30s into early next week. Above, a woman enjoys the sunshine in Greenwich Park this afternoon

Temperatures are expected to continue rising into the low 30s into early next week. Above, a woman enjoys the sunshine in Greenwich Park this afternoon

The 900-acre festival site, being headlined by Radiohead, the Foo Fighters and Ed Sheeran, will host a population of 200,000 during the event, which runs from Wednesday to Sunday.

‘It is mainly going to be dry, looking at the whole event,’ a spokeswoman for the Met Office said.

‘Wednesday, Thursday and Friday look dry with good spells of sunshine. People should take care in the heat, drink lots of water and take sun cream with them.’

The Met Office spokeswoman said temperatures were expected to fall by the weekend, feeling ‘cooler and fresher’ on Saturday and Sunday.

The show must go on: Glastonbury rain

Glasto mud: Festivalgoers last year 

Glasto mud: Festivalgoers last year 

Glasto mud: Festivalgoers last year 

There was no rainfall during the first Glastonbury Festival in 1970, which was attended by 1,500 people.

Only seven other years of the festival have not seen any rain.

The hottest days were in 2010 and 1989, when temperatures reached 27.3C – leaving some revellers with heat stroke and exhaustion.

In 2005, the festival was delayed after rainfall left some areas of the site under 4ft of water.

‘We would describe the weather as changeable,’ she added. ‘We could see a mix of sunny spells and showers.

‘There is a wedge of really hot air that is going to blow over France. 

‘That air could waft over the south of England.’

If that happens, temperatures in eastern and southern England could see temperatures of 33 or 34C.

‘I would advise those going to Glastonbury to pack for all weather – bring your Pac a Mac and sun lotion,’ the spokeswoman said. And wellies would be a good idea too.

This year, Glastonbury Festival will play host to Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who will introduce US rap duo Run The Jewels and appear at the LeftField tent for a talk.

Clive Lewis, MP for Norwich South, tweeted: ‘Chuffed to be speaking on Sat June 24 at Glastonbury 2017. Recharge your activism at the Leftfield tent with special gueststar @jeremycorbyn.’

Extra security precautions will be taken at the festival in the wake of the terror attacks in London and Manchester.

Avon and Somerset Police have said there is ‘no intelligence’ to suggest a specific threat to the festival.

Ticket-holders have been told to pack light, place luggage tags or ID on all their bags and expect searches from before entering. 

‘Like the rest of the UK, festival-goers should be alert but not alarmed,’ assistant chief constable Caroline Peters said. 

The nation basked in the hottest day of the year so far on Saturday, with temperatures expected to soar as the heatwave continues into next week. Above, Polzeath beach in Cornwall today

The nation basked in the hottest day of the year so far on Saturday, with temperatures expected to soar as the heatwave continues into next week. Above, Polzeath beach in Cornwall today

The nation basked in the hottest day of the year so far on Saturday, with temperatures expected to soar as the heatwave continues into next week. Above, Polzeath beach in Cornwall today

People enjoy a spot of crabbing today off of the old stone quay in Swanage, Dorset

People enjoy a spot of crabbing today off of the old stone quay in Swanage, Dorset

People enjoy a spot of crabbing today off of the old stone quay in Swanage, Dorset

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a heat health warning. Dr Thomas Waite from PHE said: 'For some, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and those with young children, the summer heat can bring real health risks.' Above, sunrise today over Maldon, Essex

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a heat health warning. Dr Thomas Waite from PHE said: 'For some, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and those with young children, the summer heat can bring real health risks.' Above, sunrise today over Maldon, Essex

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a heat health warning. Dr Thomas Waite from PHE said: ‘For some, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and those with young children, the summer heat can bring real health risks.’ Above, sunrise today over Maldon, Essex

Surfers hit the waves as they enjoy the hot weather at Polzeath beach in Cornwall this afternoon

Surfers hit the waves as they enjoy the hot weather at Polzeath beach in Cornwall this afternoon

Surfers hit the waves as they enjoy the hot weather at Polzeath beach in Cornwall this afternoon

And Thursday could in fact be the third warmest June date on record, reaching 93.2F (34C), according to the Met Office

June’s record temperature is 96F (35.6C), set on June 28, 1976, in Southampton.

The mercury peaked at 86F (30C) in Teddington, south-west London, while clear skies and strong sunshine were also enjoyed by the majority of Britons. 

A beachgoer bathes on the sands of Swanage this morning as the mercury continues to rise

A beachgoer bathes on the sands of Swanage this morning as the mercury continues to rise

A beachgoer bathes on the sands of Swanage this morning as the mercury continues to rise

Unusual levels of UV are also being recorded in the UK at the moment - with the strength of the UV in some spots being as high as that in Cyprus and Gibraltar. Pictured, Bredon Hill in Worcestershire this morning

Unusual levels of UV are also being recorded in the UK at the moment - with the strength of the UV in some spots being as high as that in Cyprus and Gibraltar. Pictured, Bredon Hill in Worcestershire this morning

Unusual levels of UV are also being recorded in the UK at the moment – with the strength of the UV in some spots being as high as that in Cyprus and Gibraltar. Pictured, Bredon Hill in Worcestershire this morning

A chocolate labrador unwinds with a cooling dip in the sea in Swanage, Dorset this morning

A chocolate labrador unwinds with a cooling dip in the sea in Swanage, Dorset this morning

A chocolate labrador unwinds with a cooling dip in the sea in Swanage, Dorset this morning

Temperatures are expected to continue rising into the low 30s into early next week. 

Met Office forecaster Charles Powell said: ‘We have seen the hottest day of the year so far. 

‘Sunday and Monday will see repeat performances of Saturday, with a lot of England and Wales seeing dry, sunny, warm, humid weather with high UV, high pollen. 

‘The temperature though is creeping up a little bit day on day, so we may see 91.4F (33C) on Monday, probably in similar sorts of areas – south-east England, Greater London. 

Sun-seekers take shelter from the searing heat in Dorset

Sun-seekers take shelter from the searing heat in Dorset

Flo, aged three, splashes in the  surf at Polzeath, Cornwall

Flo, aged three, splashes in the  surf at Polzeath, Cornwall

Sun-seekers take shelter from the searing heat in Dorset, left; Flo, aged three, splashes in the  surf at Polzeath, Cornwall

Young men and boys jump from the sea wall in Cullercoats Bay in North Tyneside yesterday. RNLI staff have warned against the dangers of tombstoning as the heatwave continues

Young men and boys jump from the sea wall in Cullercoats Bay in North Tyneside yesterday. RNLI staff have warned against the dangers of tombstoning as the heatwave continues

Young men and boys jump from the sea wall in Cullercoats Bay in North Tyneside yesterday. RNLI staff have warned against the dangers of tombstoning as the heatwave continues

Around half a dozen youngsters repeatedly took running jumps from the end of the south pier at Cullercoats Bay at around low water yesterday. It comes just 18 months after 15-year-old Caitlin Ruddy was swept from the pier opposite and to her death by a wave while playing with her friends

Around half a dozen youngsters repeatedly took running jumps from the end of the south pier at Cullercoats Bay at around low water yesterday. It comes just 18 months after 15-year-old Caitlin Ruddy was swept from the pier opposite and to her death by a wave while playing with her friends

Around half a dozen youngsters repeatedly took running jumps from the end of the south pier at Cullercoats Bay at around low water yesterday. It comes just 18 months after 15-year-old Caitlin Ruddy was swept from the pier opposite and to her death by a wave while playing with her friends

Tombstoning is the act of jumping in a straight vertical position into the sea, lake or reservoir from a high jumping platform, such as a cliff or pier. It is understood that between 2005 and 2015 the Coastguard dealt with more than 200 incidents of tombstoning, with 83 injuries and 20 deaths

Tombstoning is the act of jumping in a straight vertical position into the sea, lake or reservoir from a high jumping platform, such as a cliff or pier. It is understood that between 2005 and 2015 the Coastguard dealt with more than 200 incidents of tombstoning, with 83 injuries and 20 deaths

Tombstoning is the act of jumping in a straight vertical position into the sea, lake or reservoir from a high jumping platform, such as a cliff or pier. It is understood that between 2005 and 2015 the Coastguard dealt with more than 200 incidents of tombstoning, with 83 injuries and 20 deaths

Three-day outlook

Tonight: It will be a dry night across England and Wales, with largely clear skies and a few mist patches. Some patchy sea fog is possible around the coasts. A warm and uncomfortable night for sleeping, particularly in the south-east. Scotland and Northern Ireland will also be mild, but rather cloudy with a little patchy drizzle. Clear spells developing for Northern Scotland later in the night.

Tomorrow: It will be hot and humid for England and Wales, and there will be sunny periods and fair-weather cloud. Maximum temperatures are likely to be slightly higher on Monday than over the weekend, with the highest temperatures likely around London and southern England. There’s a risk of isolated thunderstorms during the afternoon. Northern parts of the country will be cooler and fresher with sunny spells and fair-weather cloud, but with a risk of drizzle in northern England and southern Scotland.

Tuesday:  Many areas will be slightly cooler, with the hottest conditions likely across southern England and south Wales. There is a chance of an isolated thunderstorm developing in the afternoon. Northern areas will be largely dry with sunny spells and patchy cloud, although the odd light shower or spot of drizzle may move into north-western coasts of Scotland. 

‘All throughout this period, we will have some pretty mild uncomfortable nights – a lot of places in the mid to high teens for night-time temperatures.’ 

The building heat is forecast to keep temperatures in the south and south east some 50F (10C) above the usual average for this time of year.

‘The sun is as powerful as it can be,’ said Mr Powell.

‘I would say we are in the midst of a heatwave. 

‘You can’t really deny the fact that most places are well above average in terms of temperatures, and it feels pretty warm.’

Western Scotland, however, is experiencing its own weather front and saw only 55.4F (13C) on Saturday, compared with the highs of around 77F (25C) seen to the east.

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a heat health warning.

Dr Thomas Waite from PHE said: ‘For some people, such as older people, those with underlying health conditions and those with young children, the summer heat can bring real health risks.

‘That’s why we’re urging everyone to keep an eye on those you know who may be at risk this summer. 

‘If you’re able, ask if your friends, family or neighbours need any support.’

Unusual levels of UV are also being recorded in the UK at the moment – with the strength of the UV in some spots being as high as that in Cyprus and Gibraltar.

This has prompted warnings that people should take extra care in the sun. 

The heat was so intense in London yesterday that at least five Guardsmen were stretchered off after fainting in their sweltering uniforms during the Trooping the Colour ceremony at the Queen’s birthday celebration.

Dressed in full uniform, including a 2lb bearskin, one soldier fell forward out of his formation as temperatures soared to 28C (82F) in Central London.

As the band marched towards his position, the guardsman collapsed to his knees before landing face down with his hands to his side. 

Today's pollen forecast again shows very high levels throughout much of Britain

Today's pollen forecast again shows very high levels throughout much of Britain

Today’s pollen forecast again shows very high levels throughout much of Britain

At least five Guardsmen were stretchered off after fainting in their sweltering uniforms in London yesterday

At least five Guardsmen were stretchered off after fainting in their sweltering uniforms in London yesterday

At least five Guardsmen were stretchered off after fainting in their sweltering uniforms in London yesterday

Pregnant woman is rescued by lifeboat after becoming trapped by tide 

A pregnant woman was rescued by a lifeboat crew after her husband swam out of a cove to raise the alarm when they became trapped by the tide.

The woman was cut off by the tide below steep cliffs near the Barrowfields in Newquay, Cornwall, on Saturday evening.

Her husband managed to swim out of the cove around to the north-east side of Tolcarne Beach to raise the alarm.

RNLI volunteers managed to rescue the woman and brought her safely to the beach just before 9.30pm.

A spokeswoman said: ‘Newquay’s RNLI lifeboat volunteers rescued a pregnant woman who was trapped by the tide below steep cliffs near the Barrowfields, more than two hours before high tide on Saturday evening.

‘Her husband swam out of the cove and around to the north-east side of Tolcarne Beach to raise the alarm and our RNLI volunteers quickly arrived on the charity’s D class inshore lifeboat, having first carefully negotiated large submerged rocks in the one-metre swell, using the lifeboat’s emergency oars to gauge the depth of water and guide them safely towards the woman’s position.

‘With Newquay Coastguard providing support from the cliff top, the RNLI lifeboat crew were able to manoeuvre back out past the rocks and landed the unhurt woman safely on Tolcarne Beach just before 9.30pm, along with a surfer who had gone to her aid before emergency services arrived.’

High tide on Saturday was at about 11.40pm.


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